A domain name is an identification string that defines a realm of administrative autonomy, authority or control within the Internet. Domain names are formed by the rules and procedures of the Domain Name System (DNS). Any name registered in the DNS is a domain name. Domain names are used in various networking contexts and for application-specific naming and addressing purposes. In general, a domain name represents an Internet Protocol (IP) resource, such as a personal computer used to access the Internet, a server computer hosting a web site, or the web site itself or any other service communicated via the Internet. In 2017, 330.6 million domain names had been registered.[1]
Name servers. Most registrars provide two or more name servers as part of the registration service. However, a registrant may specify its own authoritative name servers to host a domain's resource records. The registrar's policies govern the number of servers and the type of server information required. Some providers require a hostname and the corresponding IP address or just the hostname, which must be resolvable either in the new domain, or exist elsewhere. Based on traditional requirements (RFC 1034), typically a minimum of two servers is required.
It's rare to find a web hosting provider that offers free trial periods, but luckily, money back guarantees are common. Typically, web hosts will allow you to sign up and purchase a plan, and if you find that what you bought isn't the right option for you, you can take advantage of the money back guarantee to receive a full refund of the fees you paid.
Until 1991, the Internet was restricted to use only ...for research and education in the sciences and engineering...[1][2] and was used for email, telnet, FTP and USENET traffic - but only a tiny number of web pages. The World Wide Web protocols had only just been written[3][4] and not until the end of 1993 would there be a graphical web browser for Mac or Windows computers.[5] Even after there was some opening up of internet access, the situation was confused until 1995.[6]
This way, you really never have “your own” domain. The name of your free website builder provider is going to be permanently put in the website’s URL. Surely, some personalization is still possible – as you get to choose the name of the project but that’s really where it ends. This little issue actually makes perfect sense. After all, it would cost additional money for your provider to register a full custom domain name just for you. So if you want your page to spell “yourwebsite.com”, a free builder won’t suffice.
For the more enterprise-oriented customers, they offer a full range of VPS and cloud hosting, along with serious Java Tomcat hosting, including shared and private JVMs, as well as Java VPS offerings. With a company named MochaHost, you'd expect some quality Java support and they have it. So brew yourself a cuppa, open a browser window, and give MochaHost a spin. You have half a year to make up your mind, so if it turns out MochaHost really isn't your cup of tea, they'll understand.
Welcome to the CNET 2018 directory of hosting providers. In this directory, we'll look at a few of the best website hosting providers like Hostinger, Dreamhost, InMotion Hosting, MochaHost, Bluehost,  Lunarpages and more. In this evaluation, we're featuring commercial hosting providers who offer WordPress, Shared Hosting, VPS and many more hosting products.  
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