Shared hosting is like an apartment building where the building or server has many tenants or hosting accounts sharing the space and the utilities. This works just fine if you have a small family but if everyone in the building has ten roommates move in who are constantly running the water and using the wifi then the water pressure and wifi speed start to suffer. The key to shared hosting is that it is meant for small business websites, sure you can pack the roommates or files in like sardines but it will really be uncomfortable.
With shared hosting, you’re sharing a server and that server’s resources with a bunch of other websites. With a VPS, you’re still sharing some resources because that’s determined by the hardware, but the software itself is set up in such a way that one machine acts like multiple different servers, providing a different virtual server for every user.
If you own a business, your company needs a website. If it doesn't have one, it should. Naturally, online businesses by definition require websites for marketing and selling products or services by definition. In the internet age, however, even local brick-and-mortar business need to at the very least be discoverable via the web (and they probably ought to be selling online, too).
In particular, Web Hosting Hub uses BoldGrid as a site builder. BoldGrid is actually an add-on to WordPress, so there's no lock-in. This overcomes the major problem of most site builders: you're locked into that host and that tool, often requiring you to completely rebuild your site if you want to expand. By using a WordPress-based solution, all of the rather considerable power of WordPress is available for future expansion.

Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
×