The availability of a website is measured by the percentage of a year in which the website is publicly accessible and reachable via the Internet. This is different from measuring the uptime of a system. Uptime refers to the system itself being online. Uptime does not take into account being able to reach it as in the event of a network outage.[citation needed] A hosting provider's Service Level Agreement (SLA) may include a certain amount of scheduled downtime per year in order to perform maintenance on the systems. This scheduled downtime is often excluded from the SLA timeframe, and needs to be subtracted from the Total Time when availability is calculated. Depending on the wording of an SLA, if the availability of a system drops below that in the signed SLA, a hosting provider often will provide a partial refund for time lost. How downtime is determined changes from provider to provider, therefore reading the SLA is imperative.[11] Not all providers release uptime statistics.[12] Most hosting providers will guarantee at least 99.9% uptime which will allow for 43m of downtime per month, or 8h 45m of downtime per year.
It’s hard not love the way how SiteGround deals with customer service. Phone, tickets, live chat are all available to reach within minutes and customer satisfaction looks nothing short of great. It’s a premium option – but it may be worth the increased price! Read full review. Hostinger is a speed demon – free hosting can only dream of the speeds this provider clocks. Masterful server management puts this company way ahead of the competition. Also, the price of this hosting is so good. It’s brilliant value for your money. Read full review. Looking to build a WordPress website? There are not many providers that can compare to Bluehost. In fact, it does WordPress so well, the platform itself recommends this provider as its #1 option. For small to medium businesses, Bluehost is a great pick.  Read full review.
Second-level (or lower-level, depending on the established parent hierarchy) domain names are often created based on the name of a company (e.g., bbc.co.uk), product or service (e.g. hotmail.com). Below these levels, the next domain name component has been used to designate a particular host server. Therefore, ftp.example.com might be an FTP server, www.example.com would be a World Wide Web server, and mail.example.com could be an email server, each intended to perform only the implied function. Modern technology allows multiple physical servers with either different (cf. load balancing) or even identical addresses (cf. anycast) to serve a single hostname or domain name, or multiple domain names to be served by a single computer. The latter is very popular in Web hosting service centers, where service providers host the websites of many organizations on just a few servers.
Why should you upgrade to a VPS or Dedicated Server? This may have to do with the type of site you have. If you have a lot of photos and videos that are password protected, this may be against your host’s rules for shared accounts which often prohibit file storage. Or you have a lot of site visitors, the metaphorical guests in your apartment, and your account may start getting crowded as those guests start clogging up the “hallways” otherwise known as CPU capacity. Another reason is to have full control over the configuration of your server, if you own a house you can make modifications you may not be allowed to make in an apartment or townhome.
Website hosting is typically measured in the amount of disk space you're allotted on the server and the amount of data transfer or "bandwidth" you need for accessing the server. For example, if you have a lot of customer interaction at your website, such as files to download, you will access the server frequently and you'll need more Web hosting transfer space than someone who simply puts readable text on their website. The more "items" or "content" you have on your site (i.e., photos, maps, PDF files, etc.), the more disk space you'll need for website hosting.
Rounding out the wins, InMotion offers a full 90-day money-back guarantee. On top of that, here's a special money-saving hint. In a chat session confirming pricing and offerings, the operator offered me some special prices and deals that reduced the published price by a few bucks. I was also told that while promotional pricing does go up at the end of the offer period, if you contact customer service, InMotion has a "loyal customer discount" that may bring the price back down.
Fatcow's network-attached storage also enables any machine to access customer data. Each machine is clustered with another identical machine that will seamlessly take over if the primary unit crashes, ensuring customer data is always safe and secure. Additionally, these units are also backed by another set of storage units that include a mirror copy of the data in case of disk failure in the primary units.
Moving to another website consists of transferring the website’s files and databases, configuring your site with the new host, and directing your domain’s DNS to the new host. Once you pick a new site host, they can usually help you out with this process. The cost will depend on the host you’re switching to, but it will probably be anywhere from $150-$400.
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