The right to use a domain name is delegated by domain name registrars, which are accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the organization charged with overseeing the name and number systems of the Internet. In addition to ICANN, each top-level domain (TLD) is maintained and serviced technically by an administrative organization operating a registry. A registry is responsible for maintaining the database of names registered within the TLD it administers. The registry receives registration information from each domain name registrar authorized to assign names in the corresponding TLD and publishes the information using a special service, the WHOIS protocol.
FatCow's actions have not only inspired Moo Crew members who have made simple changes in their daily routines to contribute to the effort, but also our customers who proudly display their Green Server badges on their websites. Every FatCow customer is given a badge that they can place on their website to let visitors know that they're surfing a website backed by eco-friendly web hosting services. To learn more about FatCow's eco-friendly, visit our Green Hosting page.

Yes, you can. If you want to, you can purchase domain names from elsewhere and point it to your server with Hostinger. If you want to keep your domain name and your website hosting together under a single provider — which we’d recommend for convenience and easier troubleshooting — then you can also transfer an existing domain name to Hostinger. Just get in touch and let us know!
The user gets his or her own Web server and gains full control over it (user has root access for Linux/administrator access for Windows); however, the user typically does not own the server. One type of dedicated hosting is self-managed or unmanaged. This is usually the least expensive for dedicated plans. The user has full administrative access to the server, which means the client is responsible for the security and maintenance of his own dedicated server.
Moving to another website consists of transferring the website’s files and databases, configuring your site with the new host, and directing your domain’s DNS to the new host. Once you pick a new site host, they can usually help you out with this process. The cost will depend on the host you’re switching to, but it will probably be anywhere from $150-$400.
×