Web hosting is a necessity for any website — it is the physical location of your website on the Internet, an online storage center that houses the information, images, video, and other content that comprises your website. Web hosting service providers maintain the server where the data associated with your website resides, and also manage the technology that makes your website connect to the Internet.

Here at Hostinger, we pride ourselves on our support team. In fact, we call our support team our customer success team, because we go the extra mile to make sure that our customers are as successful as possible. If you have a problem, no matter what it is, then get in touch with us. We’ll do our best to fix it if it’s something that’s under control, and even if not, we’ll try to point you in the right direction.
Fatcow's network-attached storage also enables any machine to access customer data. Each machine is clustered with another identical machine that will seamlessly take over if the primary unit crashes, ensuring customer data is always safe and secure. Additionally, these units are also backed by another set of storage units that include a mirror copy of the data in case of disk failure in the primary units.
With a shared hosting plan, you are renting space on a server that you share with other website owners. This also means you're sharing resources like bandwidth, memory, and processing power. This can be a problem, because a web host company typically supports hundreds, even thousands, of websites on a single server. Most of these websites will get very little traffic, allowing those who do see higher levels of traffic to use the resources they need. Nevertheless, there are no guarantees that you will get the resources necessary to support your website.

Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.

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