Shared web hosting is the most affordable type of domain hosting available. Its affordability is due to the fact that you share a server with various companies who also want a low-cost web hosting plan. Each company that shares this server has its own specified amount of storage space that is defined by the hosting package Depending on the size of the server, you could possibly have thousands of websites hosted on the same platform, with each user receiving an allotment of the total available bandwidth, memory, and power.
All-in-one, everything you'll ever need to start, host and manage your successfully growing website. Unmetered and unlimited web hosting with tons of high-quality cloud features and space. All Hostinger Premium & Business web hosting plans are packed with unmetered SSD disk space & bandwidth designed to fit the needs of your website perfectly. You will also be able to host any kind of website successfully, using MySQL databases, Email accounts & FTP users.

Dedicated Hosting: Dedicated hosting is a good choice for the pros, and like its name suggests, it involves the use of a server that’s dedicated to a single website. In other words, unlike shared and VPS hosting, the user doesn’t have to share storage space and resources with other people and they have a physical piece of hardware all to themselves.
Second-level (or lower-level, depending on the established parent hierarchy) domain names are often created based on the name of a company (e.g., bbc.co.uk), product or service (e.g. hotmail.com). Below these levels, the next domain name component has been used to designate a particular host server. Therefore, ftp.example.com might be an FTP server, www.example.com would be a World Wide Web server, and mail.example.com could be an email server, each intended to perform only the implied function. Modern technology allows multiple physical servers with either different (cf. load balancing) or even identical addresses (cf. anycast) to serve a single hostname or domain name, or multiple domain names to be served by a single computer. The latter is very popular in Web hosting service centers, where service providers host the websites of many organizations on just a few servers.
Premium domains (also known as aftermarket or pre-registered domains) are short domains, often just one word or even just 3-5 letters. Most of them have a .com extension but many premium domains end with .org, .net, and .biz. These domains include common words and are generally the most memorable. Because companies value short domains that match their company name or products, these domains are typically the most desirable. Additionally, certain domains sold by different registries are considered premium and therefore have a higher price point. In some cases, the renewal costs of these higher-priced domains are also quite expensive. Some high-priced premium domains, though, renew at a regular (lower cost) rate, giving you a better value in the long term. Make sure to research the overall cost of the domain plus renewal to find the right domain for your budget. You can browse Namecheap's premium domains in our Marketplace.
DreamObjects is a cost-effective cloud storage service, which you can use to host static data for your websites, store backups, or develop the next big thing. You can access DreamObjects in your panel using the built-in interface, programmatically via standard APIs, or with a growing library of applications. DreamObjects is compatible with the Amazon S3 API.
Domain names used in works of fiction have often been registered in the DNS, either by their creators or by cybersquatters attempting to profit from it. This phenomenon prompted NBC to purchase the domain name Hornymanatee.com after talk-show host Conan O'Brien spoke the name while ad-libbing on his show. O'Brien subsequently created a website based on the concept and used it as a running gag on the show.[34]
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web... See Full Bio
A fully qualified domain name (FQDN) is a domain name that is completely specified with all labels in the hierarchy of the DNS, having no parts omitted. Labels in the Domain Name System are case-insensitive, and may therefore be written in any desired capitalization method, but most commonly domain names are written in lowercase in technical contexts.[2]
Until 1991, the Internet was restricted to use only ...for research and education in the sciences and engineering...[1][2] and was used for email, telnet, FTP and USENET traffic - but only a tiny number of web pages. The World Wide Web protocols had only just been written[3][4] and not until the end of 1993 would there be a graphical web browser for Mac or Windows computers.[5] Even after there was some opening up of internet access, the situation was confused until 1995.[6]
We’ll certainly do everything we can to lend a helping hand, whether that’s by pointing you in the right direction or by troubleshooting errors and issues. We also have a large knowledge base that’s filled with answers to existing questions, as well as a range of tutorials which were written with new customers in mind to help them to get started and to make the most of their Hostinger plan.
When it comes to server operating systems, Linux is typically the default option. Still, some services offer a choice of Linux or Windows hosting. If you have specific server-side applications that require Windows, such as SQL Server or a custom application written in .NET, then you need to make sure your web host has Windows hosting. But don't let the idea of a Linux host intimidate you. Nowadays, most web hosts offer a graphical interface or a control panel to simplify server administration and website management. Instead of typing at the command line, you'll click easily identifiable icons.
Sadly, there is a bit of a "gotcha" to the free automatic backup service. If you're paying $3.95 a month (for the first year of hosting, then $9.95 a month), you don't get restores for free. Each restore, no matter how small or large, will cost you $19.95. I'm not sure how I feel about that. On the one hand, the company has to pay salaries to tech support reps who can handle panicking customers. On the other hand, it seems kind of mean-spirited to hit someone when they're down with an added fee. That said, getting your data back – at any price – is priceless.
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