Absolutely. Owning 'yourname.com' (as well as related domains such as yourname.tech or yourname.me) is a great way to brand yourself and retain control over your name's online presence. With a personal domain name, you can set up a portfolio, blog, or hobby site that’s associated with your own personal life. You can also set up a custom email address like john@johnsmith.com allowing your visitors an easy and memorable way to reach you. So even if you have no immediate use for yourname.com, it's wise to register a personal domain to ensure that you (and not some stranger) control your name online.
The character set allowed in the Domain Name System is based on ASCII and does not allow the representation of names and words of many languages in their native scripts or alphabets. ICANN approved the Internationalized domain name (IDNA) system, which maps Unicode strings used in application user interfaces into the valid DNS character set by an encoding called Punycode. For example, københavn.eu is mapped to xn--kbenhavn-54a.eu. Many registries have adopted IDNA.
I wanted to point out that you do not mention critical issues. One is that some of the Top 5 Hosting Services do not offer an e-mail account. Others charge $14.00 a year to transfer your a Domain Name and host it with them or else the domain owner does not get the hosting for free. The list of unpleasant conditions that render those top 5 Hosting Services substantially less appetizing than you painted the picture, and that list goes on and on.
If you aim to have a web presence, you've got to have email. It's a convenient way for potential customers and clients to send you a message, Word document, or other files. Thankfully, most web hosts include email in the price of their hosting plans. Some web hosts offer unlimited email account creation (which is great for future growth), while others offer a finite amount. You, naturally, should want unlimited email.

Shared hosting is like an apartment building where the building or server has many tenants or hosting accounts sharing the space and the utilities. This works just fine if you have a small family but if everyone in the building has ten roommates move in who are constantly running the water and using the wifi then the water pressure and wifi speed start to suffer. The key to shared hosting is that it is meant for small business websites, sure you can pack the roommates or files in like sardines but it will really be uncomfortable.
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web... See Full Bio

Above all else, we strive to deliver outstanding customer experiences. When you buy a domain name from Namecheap, we guarantee it will be handed over to you with superior standards of service and support. Our primary goal is to build a customer-focused atmosphere filled with the happiest customers in the galaxy. The Namecheap guarantee is our mark of excellence.


Free website hosting. A more advanced and “serious” solution. While using such services, you won’t be limited as much as by using website builders. You are able to select a content management system of your choice (i.e. WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, etc.) and use the allowed resources to build your website. Examples of such services are 000webhost, Awardspace – and a few of others listed below.
Free hosting simply isn’t capable of things greater than practice. If you to learn how to do the basics or even set up a simple website, free website hosting is going to be just fine. For big dreams and big projects, however, you’ll need something that’s more powerful, more capable and more reliable. I, however, don’t think you need to spend big bucks. There are plenty of amazing cheap web hosts to choose from.
Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
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