Domain names serve to identify Internet resources, such as computers, networks, and services, with a text-based label that is easier to memorize than the numerical addresses used in the Internet protocols. A domain name may represent entire collections of such resources or individual instances. Individual Internet host computers use domain names as host identifiers, also called host names. The term host name is also used for the leaf labels in the domain name system, usually without further subordinate domain name space. Host names appear as a component in Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) for Internet resources such as web sites (e.g., en.wikipedia.org).

Traditionally, Windows-based hosting costs more money than Linux hosting as a result of the licensing fees assessed by Microsoft (Linux is open source and therefore free to use). However, this is less true today. Some companies, like 1&1 and GoDaddy offer hosting packages that cost the about same, regardless of which operating system you choose to run.
One's website is placed on the same server as many other sites, ranging from a few sites to hundreds of websites. Typically, all domains may share a common pool of server resources, such as RAM and the CPU. The features available with this type of service can be quite basic and not flexible in terms of software and updates. Resellers often sell shared web hosting and web companies often have reseller accounts to provide hosting for clients.
Web hosting makes it possible for visitors to view your site's content when they type in your domain name. But a Web hosting service accomplishes much more than that. It can help keep your site up -- and running smoothly -- 24/7. This is especially important in the competitive ecommerce marketplace, where interrupted availability may cause you to lose not only sales but also customers who will leave your site after a negative experience and potentially never come back.
People use websites for all kinds of things, and exactly what you want to do will dictate what kind of web hosting you need. In addition to the types of web hosting we covered in the previous section, which can generally be used for many different types of websites, there are specialty options that cater to a specific subset of users. We will cover these options below.
A good comparison of using a virtual private server is the process of owning a condo. You share the property with a few others but have ownership of your own space. Medium sized or growing companies who desire a bandwidth upgrade are perfect VPS users. For a moderate cost increase, they have a more customizable, reliable and secure system than they would have with shared hosting.

Many web hosts offer limited features in their starter packages and then expand the offerings (sometimes tremendously) for higher-tier plans. Read the small print to make sure the plan you are selecting offers what you need. If you need a site builder application to design your website, make sure that the low-cost web host you are picking actually comes with a site builder. Many of them require you to pay for the builder as a separate add-on. Website builders usually don't cost a lot of money, but if you can find a web host that includes one for free, that's money in your pocket. And, if it's integrated with your hosting service, you're more likely to have a smooth, supported experience.
Free hosting simply isn’t capable of things greater than practice. If you to learn how to do the basics or even set up a simple website, free website hosting is going to be just fine. For big dreams and big projects, however, you’ll need something that’s more powerful, more capable and more reliable. I, however, don’t think you need to spend big bucks. There are plenty of amazing cheap web hosts to choose from.

Web hosting allows businesses, organizations, and individuals to make their websites or apps visible on the internet. Whether they're using a dedicated server, or sharing resources, every website is hosted on a server. The only way for a website to be visible on the internet is if it's hosted by a web hosting service provider, also known as a web host. In order to find a website, you type the domain name (or URL) into your browser. Your computer will then connect to the server where the website is hosted, and the webpage is delivered onto your screen.
Moving to another website consists of transferring the website’s files and databases, configuring your site with the new host, and directing your domain’s DNS to the new host. Once you pick a new site host, they can usually help you out with this process. The cost will depend on the host you’re switching to, but it will probably be anywhere from $150-$400.
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