One thing we learned in reviewing the services listed here (and many more) is that even though the packages are very similar, they are not identical. Some are more security-focused than others, offering anti-spam and anti-malware tools. Others offer a variety of email marketing tools. While most of the hosts we've reviewed have built-in e-commerce, you may want to consider using a more-robust third-party online shopping cart application like Shopify instead.
HostGator gained points for uptime monitoring and regular backups, along with free cPanel or Plesk. We liked that SSH is available for the more technically inclined site operators and that dedicated IP addresses could be purchased. We did take points off because it's sometimes difficult to tell what the price is once promotional plans run their course. That said, with a generous 45-day money back guarantee, there's a solution for almost everyone at HostGator.
5GBfree is a free website hosting provider which appears to put a lot of emphasis on simplicity and effectiveness. A common and very popular cPanel interface paired together with over 140 auto-installing applications reminds me a lot of a full-fledged paid host. That can only be a good thing – on top of the free WordPress hosting you will also be allowed to do plenty of other great things.
We believe managed hosting should empower rather than limit you. We offer automatic WordPress updates that you can leave on auto-pilot or schedule. We run the latest PHP versions, but allow you to switch between versions. We enable static caching for your website, but you can easily switch it off or add more layers, like dynamic cache and memcached so you get the performance you want.
If you've ever been worried about the tremendous amount of power large data centers consume, you might want to sign up with Green Geeks. The "green" in the company's name reflects the Green Geeks' commitment to the environment. It purchases three times the energy it actually uses in wind energy credits, essentially putting energy back into the economy. The company does this through a form of renewable energy certificates, which, while a bit complicated, means that it's not just energy neutral, i's actually helping fuel the green energy economy.
FatCow's web host services are served by two Boston-area data centers. Combined, they occupy over 2400 square feet of space, comprised of over 800 Servers and half a petabyte of storage … and growing, fast! Our network infrastructure is comprised of a pooled server environment, which gives virtually any server on our network the ability to access Web site files when a request occurs. This means that the first machine available will be the one to serve a customer's Web pages, giving our customer incredibly fast load times and fewer service interruptions than our competition.
Web hosting allows businesses, organizations, and individuals to make their websites or apps visible on the internet. Whether they're using a dedicated server, or sharing resources, every website is hosted on a server. The only way for a website to be visible on the internet is if it's hosted by a web hosting service provider, also known as a web host. In order to find a website, you type the domain name (or URL) into your browser. Your computer will then connect to the server where the website is hosted, and the webpage is delivered onto your screen.

Choosing Network Solutions for your web hosting services provider is a smart business solution. We’re here to help you choose the right web hosting package for your website, and to give you great customer service all along the way. We also make it easy to upgrade to professional and premium hosting as your website acquires more and more business. Leave the hosting to us – so that you can get back to your business.


You could think of the sites that share your server as your roommates; there's really not that much separating you from them. Sure, you can close the bedroom door, but they can still cause nightmares for you in the kitchen and the bathroom. In web hosting terms, all the sites share a single server's resources, so huge traffic spike on Site A may impact the neighboring sites' performances. It's even possible that another site could take down the shared server altogether, if it crashed hard enough.
FatCow's actions have not only inspired Moo Crew members who have made simple changes in their daily routines to contribute to the effort, but also our customers who proudly display their Green Server badges on their websites. Every FatCow customer is given a badge that they can place on their website to let visitors know that they're surfing a website backed by eco-friendly web hosting services. To learn more about FatCow's eco-friendly, visit our Green Hosting page.
Domain names can be used in a number of ways. Direct visitors to your website’s home page or use complementary domains to send them to specific areas of your website ( e.g. yourcompany.jobs for a careers page). Or, forward a custom domain to an existing social media account, like your Twitter profile or Periscope channel. With a domain name you can even set up custom email addresses like yourname@yoursite.social, which can be used to conduct business or communicate with your followers. More.
Web hosting allows businesses, organizations, and individuals to make their websites or apps visible on the internet. Whether they're using a dedicated server, or sharing resources, every website is hosted on a server. The only way for a website to be visible on the internet is if it's hosted by a web hosting service provider, also known as a web host. In order to find a website, you type the domain name (or URL) into your browser. Your computer will then connect to the server where the website is hosted, and the webpage is delivered onto your screen.
A domain name, is like the address of your home; web hosting on the other hand, is the space of your house where you place your furniture. Instead of street name and area code, set of words or/and numbers are used for the website’s naming’. The same goes with hosting, computer hard disk and computer memory are used instead of instead of wood and steel for storing and processing data files.
If you own a business, your company needs a website. If it doesn't have one, it should. Naturally, online businesses by definition require websites for marketing and selling products or services by definition. In the internet age, however, even local brick-and-mortar business need to at the very least be discoverable via the web (and they probably ought to be selling online, too).
Because we offer what is known as a shared architecture, our customers share both the hardware and the "pipes" we use to transmit data across the web, so we do monitor bandwidth to ensure optimum performance for our customers. Again, we are able to support more than 99.5% of customers with no issues at all. However, in some wonderful cases, customers become so successful that their traffic and data transfer outgrow our shared architecture. When that happens, we work with the customer to identify scalable solutions, such as our Virtual Private Servers.
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Friday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36, but 99% of our readers don't give. If everyone reading this gave $3, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Friday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia became commercial, it would be a great loss to the world. Wikipedia is a place to learn, not a place for advertising. It unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable, neutral information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
Sadly, there is a bit of a "gotcha" to the free automatic backup service. If you're paying $3.95 a month (for the first year of hosting, then $9.95 a month), you don't get restores for free. Each restore, no matter how small or large, will cost you $19.95. I'm not sure how I feel about that. On the one hand, the company has to pay salaries to tech support reps who can handle panicking customers. On the other hand, it seems kind of mean-spirited to hit someone when they're down with an added fee. That said, getting your data back – at any price – is priceless.
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