Shared hosting is like an apartment building where the building or server has many tenants or hosting accounts sharing the space and the utilities. This works just fine if you have a small family but if everyone in the building has ten roommates move in who are constantly running the water and using the wifi then the water pressure and wifi speed start to suffer. The key to shared hosting is that it is meant for small business websites, sure you can pack the roommates or files in like sardines but it will really be uncomfortable.

It's important to note, however, that not all shared hosting is created equal. Different companies use different servers, each configured with different amounts of resources, and with different features. Furthermore, some companies host more websites on a single server than its peers. As such, that $10 per month shared hosting plan probably has many benefits over one costing $0.99 per month.
The right to use a domain name is delegated by domain name registrars, which are accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), the organization charged with overseeing the name and number systems of the Internet. In addition to ICANN, each top-level domain (TLD) is maintained and serviced technically by an administrative organization operating a registry. A registry is responsible for maintaining the database of names registered within the TLD it administers. The registry receives registration information from each domain name registrar authorized to assign names in the corresponding TLD and publishes the information using a special service, the WHOIS protocol.
We’ll certainly do everything we can to lend a helping hand, whether that’s by pointing you in the right direction or by troubleshooting errors and issues. We also have a large knowledge base that’s filled with answers to existing questions, as well as a range of tutorials which were written with new customers in mind to help them to get started and to make the most of their Hostinger plan.
Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
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