DreamObjects is a cost-effective cloud storage service, which you can use to host static data for your websites, store backups, or develop the next big thing. You can access DreamObjects in your panel using the built-in interface, programmatically via standard APIs, or with a growing library of applications. DreamObjects is compatible with the Amazon S3 API.
Examples of other TLD include .uk, .ws, .co.jp, .com.sg, .tv, .edu, .co, .com.my, and .mobi. While most of these TLDs are open for public’s registration, there are strict regulations on certain domain registration. For example the registration of country code top level domains (like .co.uk for United Kingdom) are restricted for the citizens of the corresponding country; and the activities with such domains website are ruled by local regulations and cyber laws.
Dedicated hosting is not for everyone and generally provides more resources than the average business requires. Dedicated hosting is ideal for very large companies that regularly experience a high volume of internet traffic or sales, or require a large amount of disk space. Dedicated hosting grants you the greatest flexibility, customization, and security of the three types of hosting but is also the most expensive.

A few companies have offered low-cost, below-cost or even free domain registration with a variety of models adopted to recoup the costs to the provider. These usually require that domains be hosted on their website within a framework or portal that includes advertising wrapped around the domain holder's content, revenue from which allows the provider to recoup the costs. Domain registrations were free of charge when the DNS was new. A domain holder may provide infinite number of subdomains in their domain. For example, the owner of example.org could provide subdomains such as foo.example.org and foo.bar.example.org to interested parties.
Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
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