On the internet, there seems to be no location. You can visit a site out of Beijing as easily as you can from Topeka. But just because you can go everywhere in the world on the internet doesn't mean that the internet isn't localized. If you want your website visitors to be served as quickly as possible, your best bet is to host your site on a web server as close to your users as possible.

Shared Hosting: This is usually the cheapest form of website hosting because it’s the most economical when it comes to the use of hardware. Shared hosting means that multiple different websites are all hosted on the same server, with each user being allocated a certain amount of storage space and a certain amount of resources. This is often the best option for hobbyists and bloggers.
An SSL certificate ensures all information transmitted to and from your website is protected from third parties attempting to access it. It is important because browsers, like Google Chrome, mark pages without https and the green padlock in the address bar as not secure. This can have a negative effect on the trustworthiness of your website. Pages that are protected with SSL receive better search engine rankings, and are more likely to be trusted by visitors.
In the first quarter of 2015, 294 million domain names had been registered.[17] A large fraction of them are in the com TLD, which as of December 21, 2014, had 115.6 million domain names,[18] including 11.9 million online business and e-commerce sites, 4.3 million entertainment sites, 3.1 million finance related sites, and 1.8 million sports sites.[19] As of July 2012 the com TLD had more registrations than all of the ccTLDs combined.[20]
You gain the most web-building functionality if you create a self-hosted site. This typically involves transfering the free WordPress CMS to server or signing up for a web host's optimized WordPress plan. With an optimized plan, the host automatically handles backend stuff, so you don't have to worry about updating the plug-ins and CMS, and enabling automatic backups. In these instances, the WordPress environment typically comes pre-installed on the server.
Choosing is simple: select hosting that will support the script, platform, or CMS you want to use. And if you aren't sure, go for Linux hosting. For example, WordPress will run on Linux and Windows, but hosts generally recommend that you run it on Linux. However, if you want to use a Windows-specific technology like ASP.NET, you'll need a Windows host.
In the first quarter of 2015, 294 million domain names had been registered.[17] A large fraction of them are in the com TLD, which as of December 21, 2014, had 115.6 million domain names,[18] including 11.9 million online business and e-commerce sites, 4.3 million entertainment sites, 3.1 million finance related sites, and 1.8 million sports sites.[19] As of July 2012 the com TLD had more registrations than all of the ccTLDs combined.[20]

ICANN publishes the complete list of TLD registries and domain name registrars. Registrant information associated with domain names is maintained in an online database accessible with the WHOIS protocol. For most of the 250 country code top-level domains (ccTLDs), the domain registries maintain the WHOIS (Registrant, name servers, expiration dates, etc.) information.
Yes, you can. If you want to, you can purchase domain names from elsewhere and point it to your server with Hostinger. If you want to keep your domain name and your website hosting together under a single provider — which we’d recommend for convenience and easier troubleshooting — then you can also transfer an existing domain name to Hostinger. Just get in touch and let us know!
Word of mouth only gets you so far in this internet-centric age. These days, people discover new businesses—even local business—via Bing, Google, and Yahoo, search engines that make it incredibly simple to find companies' products, operational hours, and prices. If your business doesn't appear in the search results, especially on the first page, it'll be difficult for potential clients and customers to find you. In other words, no website, no money. Of course, web hosting isn't just for businesses. You may want to host a personal website or blog, too. Either way, the services here have you covered.
If you aim to have a web presence, you've got to have email. It's a convenient way for potential customers and clients to send you a message, Word document, or other files. Thankfully, most web hosts include email in the price of their hosting plans. Some web hosts offer unlimited email account creation (which is great for future growth), while others offer a finite amount. You, naturally, should want unlimited email.
Absolutely. Owning 'yourname.com' (as well as related domains such as yourname.tech or yourname.me) is a great way to brand yourself and retain control over your name's online presence. With a personal domain name, you can set up a portfolio, blog, or hobby site that’s associated with your own personal life. You can also set up a custom email address like john@johnsmith.com allowing your visitors an easy and memorable way to reach you. So even if you have no immediate use for yourname.com, it's wise to register a personal domain to ensure that you (and not some stranger) control your name online.
For special purposes, such as network testing, documentation, and other applications, IANA also reserves a set of special-use domain names.[15] This list contains domain names such as example, local, localhost, and test. Other top-level domain names containing trade marks are registered for corporate use. Cases include brands such as BMW, Google, and Canon.[16]
Enjoy shared web hosting for your home and business. Our secure hosting platform offers a 100% uptime guarantee. Our updated cPanel is live with the new Website Builder, perfect for building your personal website within minutes. To make sure your site is secure, we're also pleased to offer up to 50 free PositiveSSL certificates for your website for one year →

They got other customer-centric bonuses for 24/7 support, including 24/7 toll-free callback phone support, free domain name and SSL certificates for as long as you remain a MochaHost customer, a website builder with 500 free templates (and a service that will custom-design your site if you need), a site migration service. In addition, all plans are e-commerce ready and come with free shopping cart software.
The answer is simple – despite having many different names, all of these companies belong to the same German AttractSoft group. That may not necessarily mean something evil – it could be that each service is just meant to cater to a different market and/or audience. For example, Awardspace is more popular in the US and India, while Netfirms is a well-known name in Canada.
For special purposes, such as network testing, documentation, and other applications, IANA also reserves a set of special-use domain names.[15] This list contains domain names such as example, local, localhost, and test. Other top-level domain names containing trade marks are registered for corporate use. Cases include brands such as BMW, Google, and Canon.[16]
In order to register any domain, you must provide certain personal information that you may not wish to be publically searchable in the Whois database. Signing up for WhoisGuard is a great way to keep your registration data private. WhoisGuard acts as a "shield" for your searchable information, displaying the address, phone number, and email of the domain registrar (Namecheap, e.g.) instead of your own. Keep in mind that WhoisGuard is an optional security add-on that must be renewed separately when you renew your domain.
Traditionally, Windows-based hosting costs more money than Linux hosting as a result of the licensing fees assessed by Microsoft (Linux is open source and therefore free to use). However, this is less true today. Some companies, like 1&1 and GoDaddy offer hosting packages that cost the about same, regardless of which operating system you choose to run.
The practice of using a simple memorable abstraction of a host's numerical address on a computer network dates back to the ARPANET era, before the advent of today's commercial Internet. In the early network, each computer on the network retrieved the hosts file (host.txt) from a computer at SRI (now SRI International),[4][5] which mapped computer host names to numerical addresses. The rapid growth of the network made it impossible to maintain a centrally organized hostname registry and in 1983 the Domain Name System was introduced on the ARPANET and published by the Internet Engineering Task Force as RFC 882 and RFC 883.
Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
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