For plans or packages featuring unlimited websites, domains, or email accounts, we do not enforce any official limitations. Customers are able to utilize as many of these features as they wish. That said, these are of course not infinite resources and there are inherent maximums associated with the technology powering them. For example, while email account creation is unlimited, these rely on the file storage available on the account. Therefore customers need to be operating within the Terms of Service to ensure resources are available to fully enable email functionality. Customers operating within the Terms of Service have yet to come up against technical boundaries for email, domains, or websites.
Web hosting is effectively the process of using a server to host a website, and there are all sorts of different types of web hosting available out there on the market. Hostinger, just like most web hosts offer different packages so that their customers can pay for just the resources that they need. The more popular the website is, the more resources it’s likely to need to function effectively.

I wanted to point out that you do not mention critical issues. One is that some of the Top 5 Hosting Services do not offer an e-mail account. Others charge $14.00 a year to transfer your a Domain Name and host it with them or else the domain owner does not get the hosting for free. The list of unpleasant conditions that render those top 5 Hosting Services substantially less appetizing than you painted the picture, and that list goes on and on.
The company doesn't list a virtual private server offering, but they bill their Elastic Sites service as a VPS alternative, offering the ease of use of a simple shared hosting plan and the performance and scalability of a VPS. GlowHost also offers a number of different cloud hosting plans, with special attention to providing enterprise-grade services.
Many services offer so-called unlimited or unmetered service for whatever amount of bandwidth, disk storage and sites you use. It's important to understand that most terms of service actually do limit the definition of "unlimited" to what's considered reasonable use. The bottom line is simple: if you're building a pretty basic website, unlimited means you don't need to worry. But if you're trying to do something excessive (or illegal, immoral or fattening), the fine print in the terms of service will trigger, and you'll either be asked to spend more or go elsewhere.
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